7. Rethink the financing and implementation of humanitarian aid.

 

National instability and food insecurity are closely intertwined, as unfolding crises swell the numbers of migrants and other vulnerable groups globally. In response to recent developments in the number of parallel crises and migrants worldwide, the food security community must now fully integrate humanitarian assistance and crisis management into its strategies and secure new sources of support for humanitarian aid. A strong call is needed for the creation of new systems for providing relief, and the public and private sectors should aim to secure new sources of support for humanitarian aid while also investing in transforming agriculture, building supply chains, and developing commodity markets.

Fully integrate humanitarian assistance and crisis management into national strategic planning, as a matter of national and economic security.

 

To reframe food security approaches post-Arab Spring, in an environment where food prices have come down—but still remain above 2006 levels—the imperative of food security as a national and economic security lever must be emphasized. The scale of the global humanitarian crisis today is directly relevant to economic and political volatility, as so many people in so many varying contexts are driven away from their homes by conflict and climate change. Gaps in the global food system must be bridged, as both a matter of economic growth and political stability, given governments’ responsibility to feed those vulnerable populations that cannot feed themselves.


In response to recent developments in the number of parallel crises and migrants worldwide, the food security community must now fully integrate humanitarian assistance and crisis management into national strategic planning. As a long term approach to food security under the new norm of volatility, investment should be made into establishing new systems for providing relief, transforming agriculture, building supply chains, and developing commodity markets.

 

Humanitarian approaches should be considered in tandem with issues of nutrition, welfare and social services, and cross-sector partnerships established that can provide additional to support for developing effective humanitarian aid mechanisms. 
 

Photo Credit: flickr@USAID 

Secure ongoing funding for international humanitarian assistance.

 

Historically, the food security response to global crises has been reactionary, basing funds on emergency appeals and voluntary contributions. This unsustainable architecture for long-term food security has resulted in declining support for an increasing need.

 

Therefore, the public and private sectors should aim to secure new sources of support for humanitarian aid by establishing new mechanisms for ensuring predictable funding.
Government contributions and donations from private sources (including foundations, corporations and individuals) have grown over the past few years in response to the rising demand. These international resources continue to play a critical role in supplementing the efforts of governments unable to fully meet the level of need of vulnerable populations.

 

A combination of public and private funds must continue to be established to enable this ongoing effort.
As the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) struggles to support the current humanitarian aid needs relating to ongoing refugee crises, with contributions from governments, corporations and individuals proving inadequate to meet the current level of need, new sources of income must be identified and commitments made to enable the ongoing relief work of the UN agencies, including the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR), the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), the World Food Programme (WFP), and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). 

Photo Credit: flickr@Al Jazeera English